Daily Dispatches
Mirrors, in foreground, reflect sunlight onto a power tower at the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System near Primm, Nev.
Associated Press/Photo by John Locher
Mirrors, in foreground, reflect sunlight onto a power tower at the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System near Primm, Nev.

Energy-efficient power plant sets birds on fire

Newsworthy

Sometimes well-meaning environmental measures can cause adverse affects. A state-of-the-art solar plant in the Mojave Desert powers 140,000 homes but inadvertently ignites birds flying overhead. According to the Associated Press, workers at the solar plant have a name for birds when they fly through the plant’s concentrated sun rays—“streamers.” When the birds catch fire and plummet to the ground, they carry a smoke plume behind them. Federal wildlife investigators reported an average of one streamer every two minutes, and are urging California officials to deny the operator’s application to build a bigger version of the plant. Google is one of three companies backing the plant, which is located near the California-Nevada border. It uses more than 300,000 mirrors to reflect solar rays onto boiler towers, which then produce steam to turn turbines.

Man breaks probation by stealing Walmart shopping cart

An Albuquerque, N.M., man allegedly stole and rode a Walmart electric shopping cart to meet his probation officer. KOAT-TV reports when the probation officer asked Michael Johnson, 18, where the cart came from, Johnson admitted to taking it from a nearby store. Johnson was arrested and charged with larceny and receiving stolen property. By being arrested, he violated his probation and was held on a $500 bond. Albuquerque police spokesman Tanner Tixier said the cart is worth more than $1,800.

Japanese retiree becomes oldest living man

Guinness World Records recognized the world’s oldest living man Wednesday. He is 111-year-old Sakari Momoi, a retired Japanese educator. Momoi was born on Feb. 5, 1903, and spent career as a teacher and high school principle. Now, he spends his time readings books—he has a fondness for Chinese poetry—and sometimes practicing calligraphy. He has five children and lives in a nursing home. When asked how he felt about the record, Momoi said he wants to live longer: “Say, another two years.” He succeeds Alexander Imich of New York, who died in June at the age of 111 years, 164 days. The world’s oldest living person, 116-year old woman Misao Okawa, is also Japanese. Momoi is one of 54,000 centenarians in Japan, which has the world’s high average life expectancy: 80.21 for men and 86.61 for women.

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Allie Hulcher
Allie Hulcher

Allie is a World Journalism Institute intern.

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