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‘Rush to accountability’ in VA wait time scandal

"‘Rush to accountability’ in VA wait time scandal" Continued...

“It is not the case that the rest of health care in America is just wonderful,” he said. 

But Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., struck back, arguing that while “the chairman has said we shouldn’t have a rush to judgment … we should have a rush to accountability.”

To blunt the hearing’s negative press, the Obama White House late Wednesday announced it had appointed a top advisor, deputy chief of staff Rob Nabors, to assist the VA as it tries to correct its scheduling issues.

Meanwhile, just before Thursday’s hearing, the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America and Project on Government Oversight announced a joint initiative to protect VA whistle-blowers. The new website the watchdog groups are launching will help shield veterans who come forward with more allegations and evidence of misconduct and wrongdoing at VA facilities across the nation.

“Our members are outraged and expect substantive and meaningful evidence that long-standing inefficiency are being appropriately addressed and appropriate VA personal are being held accountable,” said Tom Tarantino, the chief policy officer for the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America. “Veterans must be assured that the VA can deliver quality care in a timely matter. Veterans are tired of business as usual. The VA has a long way to go to earn back the trust and confidence of the millions of veterans shaken by this growing controversy.”

The VA operates 150 medical centers and 820 outpatient clinics where 85 million appointments are scheduled each year. VA officials claim 2 million additional patients have been added to the rolls since 2009.

Edward Lee Pitts
Edward Lee Pitts

Lee is WORLD's Washington Bureau chief. As a reporter for the Chattanooga Times Free Press, he was embedded with a National Guard unit in Iraq. He also once worked in the press office of Sen. Lamar Alexander.

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