Virtual Voices
Customers line up at an Allen, Texas, location of Chick-fil-A to show support for Dan Cathy’s stance on traditional marriage on Chick-fil-A Appreciation Day, Aug. 1, 2012.
Associated Press/Photo by Michael Prengler (special contributor)
Customers line up at an Allen, Texas, location of Chick-fil-A to show support for Dan Cathy’s stance on traditional marriage on Chick-fil-A Appreciation Day, Aug. 1, 2012.

Chick-fil-A’s regret

Business

Chick-fil-A CEO and president Dan Cathy apparently regrets making the company a symbol of traditional marriage. He said in a recent interview with the Atlanta-Journal Constitution:

“The bottom line is we have a responsibility here to keep the whole of the organization in mind and it has to take precedence over the personal expression and opinion on social issues. … I think [same-sex marriage is] a political debate that’s going to rage on. And the wiser thing for us to do is to stay focused on customer service.”

While Cathy might not have intended to make his company a symbol of traditional marriage, his opponents certainly did. Chick-fil-A is a well-known company, and any business (or person) that publicly supports traditional values is a target for unrighteous indignation from the secular left.

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I echo Jim Denison’s sentiments. No matter what you do, someone will have cause to complain. Every policy is wrought with potential controversy. Chick-fil-A closes on Sundays. Would a Jewish or Muslim employee cry foul? “Christian” isn’t a label; it’s who we are. Christ is in us. We were raised with Him. The apostle Paul wrote in 2 Corinthians, “[W]e are ambassadors for Christ, God making his appeal through us. We implore you on behalf of Christ, be reconciled to God. For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.” We are Christ’s representatives, and this fact alone stokes controversy.

Any dissent from the mainstream cultivates scrutiny, especially when expressing our faith, whether we intend to be scrutinized or not. Part of the secular left’s goals is to attempt to shame dissenters as bigots and racists and shut down the discussion. This is why conservative Christians, business owners or not, must speak out on these issues.

Unfortunately, it seems that Cathy has done more than merely express regret for supporting a high-profile issue as redefining marriage to include two people of the same sex. AL.com reports that Chick-fil-A has reduced donations to groups opposed to the redefinition of marriage. Cathy said that it’s “probably very wise from our standpoint to make sure that we present our brand in a compelling way that the consumer can relate to.”

I understand the desire to focus on business and steer clear of controversy. Controversy is stressful. But all sorts of businesses donate money to causes. The ones that give money to the abortion mill Planned Parenthood or toward policies that undermine family stability or contribute to cultural depravity don’t seem worried about customers who oppose such causes. From my vantage point they couldn’t care less what we think. Why should Cathy and other Christian business owners separate faith and business?

America needs more companies and individuals to stand against immorality and give money and time to causes dedicated to protecting marriage and unborn children. There will be consequences to what we say and do, so let the fallout flow from the righteous cause.

La Shawn Barber
La Shawn Barber

La Shawn writes about culture, faith, and politics. Her work has appeared in the Christian Research Journal, Christianity Today, the Washington Examiner, and other publications

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