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Madeleine Kara Lim
Courtesy photo
Madeleine Kara Lim

It’s a girl!

Embryo adoption | Paul and Susan Lim welcome daughter Madeleine, whom they adopted as an embryo

This is the fifth installment in our reality series about Paul and Susan Lim, who have chosen to adopt an abandoned embryo, even though the pregnancy could cost Susan her eyesight. Read the first chapter of their story to learn why they decided to pursue embryo adoption.

Madeleine Kara Lim was born at 9:03 a.m. on Nov. 29, seven days early. “She’s been waiting for years to be born, after all,” said her father, Paul. Her mother, Susan, stopped her work as a pediatrician Wednesday, Nov. 27, entertained guests for a few days, then prepared for Thanksgiving festivities. Last Tuesday she bought diapers, wipes, and baby soap. She laughed, “People think I’m so prepared. But I don’t even have diapers yet!”

At that time Susan was “in normal nesting mode” and busy with last minute prep.

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“We’ve given her a name, and prayed for her by name,” said Susan. “We’re definitely curious what she’s going to look like. It’s like we know each other already, yet we can’t wait to meet her.”

The Lims called their obstetrician when Susan went into labor at midnight on Thanksgiving. Nine hours later, Madeleine was born. Missionary friends from Thailand, Ethiopia, and China have sent their congratulations to the Lims.

Baby Madeleine has no genetics in common with her new brother Justin, but according to Susan and big sister Karis, the two look alike.  At birth Madeleine weighed 7 pounds and 2 ounces.  “She is beautiful,” said Paul. “Everything has been wonderful so far.”

Now that the Lims have met Madeleine, Paul finds discarding embryos even more repellant. “It’s insanity that parents would give her up,” he said.

Some people think of embryos as “just cells.” In the image of the two embryos the Lims adopted, no scientist can tell which child is Madeleine. “But God can,” Paul said. “Just because I can’t tell the difference doesn’t mean there isn’t one.”

When his kids disobey, Paul asks them “Who is happy you did that? God or Satan?” He says that when embryos are killed, only Satan is happy. Madeleine looks different now than she did as an embryo, just as she will look different at 50. “There is nothing deformed about her,” said Paul.

This pregnancy has required more frequent doctor visits than Susan had during her pregnancies with Justin and Karis, now ages eight and 10. After her 32nd week of pregnancy, Susan made weekly visits to the doctor, who required non-stress tests and biophysical profiles. But now, mother and baby are healthy. Susan did not experience any further complications of her rare eye condition for which she could not take medication while pregnant.

The day before Madeleine’s birth, Susan reflected on the 39 weeks she spent carrying Madeleine. She expressed gratitude for God's faithfulness and graciousness in allowing her to be Madeleine's mother. She said she was humbled by the outpouring of prayer from people who have read the articles and committed to pray for a healthy pregnancy. 

Chelsea Kolz Boes
Chelsea Kolz Boes

Chelsea is an editorial assistant for God’s World News. She graduated from Patrick Henry College with a degree in literature. Follow Chelsea on Twitter @chelseakboes.

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