Signs and Wonders
Eladio Gomez uses a U.S. flag to cover him from a light rain during an immigrant rights rally in downtown Dallas.
Associated Press/Photo by LM Otero
Eladio Gomez uses a U.S. flag to cover him from a light rain during an immigrant rights rally in downtown Dallas.

Signs and Wonders: America’s demographic destiny

Newsworthy

Brown and grey. The U.S. Census Bureau recently released its latest population projections through the year 2060. Fifty years from now, the U.S. will be only 43 percent white (compared to 63 percent today), and we’ll be much older. The over 65 cohort will more than double in size, to 90 million, while the under 65 age group will grow, but at a much slower rate. One implication of this demographic shift could be that America will get more conservative, since older folk are generally more conservative. Interestingly, while the percentage of the American population that is African-American will stay almost constant over the next 50 years, Hispanics’ share of the population will double, to more than 30 percent. Politically speaking, the party that wins Hispanics will be the party in charge in 2060.

Standing O. I was in New York last night attending the annual dinner for the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty. The organization gives an annual Canterbury Medal to a religious leader who has made significant contributions to the preservation of religious liberty, and this year the medal went to Elder Dallin Oaks of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Oaks’ contributions to the preservation of traditional marriage are robust, and the crowd quite properly gave him a standing ovation when he received his award. The Becket Fund represents all manner of religious people in lawsuits, including Hobby Lobby. In fact, Hobby Lobby’s Steve Green was in attendance, and he got a standing ovation too from the crowd of more than 500 gathered at the Pierre Hotel. Chicago Archbishop Cardinal Francis Eugene George introduced Elder Oaks, and he also received a standing ovation. I don’t think I’ve ever been to an event were a Catholic, a Mormon, and an evangelical all got standing ovations from the same crowd. But such are the times, when in some arenas, religious people—even those with theological differences—must hang together to avoid hanging separately.

Standing with the Scouts. The group OnMyhonor.net has organized rallies in more than 40 cities today to let local Boy Scout leaders know they oppose a change to the policy banning homosexuals from the Scouting program. The vote on the proposed policy will take place next week. 

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Bible ban. Ed Buckner, an atheist, didn’t like the fact that Bibles were in cabins at Georgia state parks. So he protested and got them removed. But the state’s Attorney General said that since the state had not paid for the books, the state wasn’t officially endorsing religion. On Wednesday, Gov. Nathan Deal ordered the Bibles returned.  According to the Associated Press, "Buckner is pondering his next move. One idea he is considering is to test the state's offer to accept literature from other religions in state-owned lodging. He also said he would be willing to participate if an organization with similar beliefs decides to launch a lawsuit over the issue."

Warren Cole Smith
Warren Cole Smith

Warren, who lives in Charlotte, N.C., is vice president of WORLD News Group and the host of the radio program Listening In. Follow Warren on Twitter @WarrenColeSmith.

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