Daily Dispatches

Proverbs 31, Victoria's Secret, and viral marketing

"Proverbs 31, Victoria's Secret, and viral marketing" Continued...

The convergence of Bisutti’s and Eklund’s messages is a good example of social media’s ability to level the playing field, giving users the potential to build a platform and allowing freer access between celebrities and individuals, Pfeiffer said, adding, “That is part of the democratization of social media. Individuals have a lot more power and leverage that never really existed before, or that was more difficult. Individuals with the right message can reach a large audience and influence ethical issues.”

Bisutti has continued to promote and retweet material for Live31 to her 8,000 followers. “Their message is so biblical and Christ-centered, and it is exactly what I’m striving to be,” she said. “I love every bit of their message, and it all resonates with what I believe,” she told WORLD on Campus in an email interview last year.

Bisutti, who receives numerous tweets a day from followers thanking her for being their role model, praised social networks for giving her the opportunity to spread her message: “God’s telling my story using social media and I’m grateful to be a part of it. I think it’s reached a lot more people through this outlet, but nothing is too big for God.”

Today, Bisutti is preparing to release a new memoir, I’m No Angel, about her modeling career and launch a line of clothing that emphasizes style and modesty.

Eklund and his friends are developing a series of videos on the Live31 website and plan to continue leveraging social media to spread their message. “It is our platform at the moment,” Bartlemay said. “It’s not just on the Baylor campus; it’s not just Texas. Our best way to be able to contact people is social media.”

Eklund agreed: “Social media is what we are.”

A version of this article originally appeared at WORLD on Campus on March 12, 2012.

Christina Darnell
Christina Darnell

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