Globe Trot
An original 1939 Ministry of Information
Associated Press/Photo by Sang Tan
An original 1939 Ministry of Information "Keep Calm and Carry On" poster is seen on display at Christie's auction house in London

Globe Trot: No need to panic

International

“Keep Calm and Carry On” is a good Monday slogan, and originally part of a 1939 British war propaganda campaign. But it actually never went public during World War II. One of the posters turned up in a used bookshop in northeast England in 2000 in “a box of dusty books." A year later the poster went on sale—and since has become an iconic symbol of Western resilience: “Like a voice out of history, it offers a very simple, warm-hearted message to inspire confidence in others during difficult times.” Worth three minutes to watch the warm-hearted clip below from Barter Books Ltd.

The risk of drug-resistant tuberculosis is growing along the U.S.-Mexico border, with unusually high rates of the dangerous strain of TB showing up in California and Texas.

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Polls show that two-thirds of South Koreans support the idea of developing their own nuclear arsenal following North Korea’s underground nuclear test last month and the country's recent threats to the South. Both countries have new leaders intent to shore up their own power bases.

An Egyptian evangelical Christian has died after spending 10 days in a Libyan jail in Benghazi, where he reportedly also faced torture. Ezzat Hakim Attalah, a 45-year-old father of two, was arrested on Feb. 28 along with five other evangelicals on charges of proselytizing.

Islamist fighters killed seven foreign construction workers in northern Nigeria after detaining them for several weeks. The victims were four Lebanese and one citizen each from Britain, Greece, and Italy. Britain and Italy said all seven of those taken from the Setraco construction company compound had died at the hands of Ansaru, a previously little-known splinter group of the Islamist sect Boko Haram. 

Because of a “scarcity of swordsmen,” Saudi Arabia has said it is considering public firing squads as an alternate to beheadings as a means of execution.

A tiny scrap of wool found during an archaeological dig in northern England proved key to unlocking a piece of history. The dig has unearthed what appears to be a Christian church, dating back to the fifth or sixth century. Dating the church became possible after a grad student found the textile scrap in the grave of what appears to be remains of a 14-year-old girl. The remains could not be carbon-dated, but radiocarbon dating of the fleece revealed it had probably been sheared between A.D. 240 and A.D. 340, placing it in a late Roman era.

Mindy Belz
Mindy Belz

Mindy travels to the far corners of the globe as the editor of WORLD and lives with her family in the mountains of western North Carolina. Follow Mindy on Twitter @mcbelz.

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