Globe Trot
Demonstrators hold candles in memory of protester Mohammed Qorany, at the spot where he died in clashes, near the presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt.
Associated Press/Photo by Virginie Nguyen Hoang
Demonstrators hold candles in memory of protester Mohammed Qorany, at the spot where he died in clashes, near the presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt.

Globe Trot: Unsafe in Egypt, military suicides, Hillary Clinton’s last speech and Richard III found

International

Egypt “overall is entering into a very dangerous phase,” says Hudson Institute’s Sam Tadros, one of the best experts to follow on Egypt (and an Egyptian Copt), in one of the best summaries of the crisis. An average Eygptian is now “pretty unsafe” doing daily life, he said, plus for the first time in Egypt’s two-year upheaval, trade through the Suez Canal is at risk. Tadro also is succinct in describing the Obama administration’s “offhand approach that deals with daily problems as they emerge [but] doesn’t have a longterm strategy.” The most basic question: Is the Morsi regime likely to be friendly to the interests of the United States? There’s no getting around the fact that Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood embraces “an anti-Western ideology.” Spend four minutes watching this.

"Every day about 22 veterans in the United States kill themselves, a rate that is about 20 percent higher than the Department of Veterans Affairs' 2007 estimate,” according to a two-year study. But most of those veterans are 50 and older, suggesting that the soaring rate of suicides in the military is not directly tied to wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Hillary Rodham Clinton delivered her final remarks as U.S. secretary of state on Friday at the Council on Foreign Relations’ Washington office. In her speech, she made clear one of her key “accomplishments” was pushing the office of Global Women’s Issues, which the president made a permanent part of the State Department last week. She also touted her push for gay rights around the world. Not every country welcomes the agenda, and U.S. taxpayers should question both the expenditures for installing gender equality officers at embassies around the world and the priority of it.

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Researchers confirmed today that they have found the 500-year-old remains of King Richard III beneath a parking lot in Leicester, England. Richard III was the last English monarch to die in battle, killed by Henry VII and immortalized by William Shakespeare—whose play by the king’s name first used the terms “tower of strength” and “hunchbacked.” The skeleton showed signs of a violent death and scoliosis, or curvature of the spine, and DNA tests verified the bones belonged to the monarch.

Mindy Belz
Mindy Belz

Mindy travels to the far corners of the globe as the editor of WORLD and lives with her family in the mountains of western North Carolina. Follow Mindy on Twitter @mcbelz.

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