Globe Trot
Supporters of Hugo Chavez celebrate his return to Venezuela today.
Associated Press/Photo by Fernando Llano
Supporters of Hugo Chavez celebrate his return to Venezuela today.

Globe Trot: Chavez returns, leaked pope papers, TB in India, Iraq survivor, Copts attacked

International

President Hugo Chavez made a surprise return to Venezuela following cancer treatment in Cuba.

A web of corruption and backbiting is coming to light with an unprecedented leak of personal correspondence involving just-resigned Pope Benedict XVI.

If you missed last night’s 60 Minutes, its segments are well worth watching online: A positive and motivational profile of the work of Mercy Ships in Africa, the dramatic working of Iron Dome in Israel, and an interview with British actress Maggie Smith.

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New strategies for treating drug-resistant TB in India appear to be nurturing spread of the disease—as a once-curable killer has, over time, become almost untreatable again.

The sole survivor of a 12-man unit cut down in a 2005 insurgent bombing in Iraq struggles with guilt, remorse, and putting his life back together. In 2005 WORLD profiled one of those killed in that attack.

Muslim villagers in Egypt attacked a church this weekend, pelting worshippers, tearing down a cross, and setting fire to the building. It was the second attack in a little over a month against Coptic Christians in Fayoum Province.

Mindy Belz
Mindy Belz

Mindy travels to the far corners of the globe as the editor of WORLD and lives with her family in the mountains of western North Carolina. Follow Mindy on Twitter @mcbelz.

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