Lead Stories

Feeding the hungry

"Feeding the hungry" Continued...

Several people I interviewed in line thought the people serving them food were from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The church volunteers didn’t advertise themselves. But many people knew who had remembered them. When the power came back on late on Friday, hundreds of people wrote a thank you note to the churches on a big piece of cardboard.

John Black from Forefront Church lives in the neighborhood—but not in the projects. The only time Black has been to the projects has been running through them to get to the waterfront for a jog. “I’m embarrassed,” he said. “The need exists whether or not there’s a hurricane. Hopefully this is an eye opener.” 

The need continued even after the city restored power. Some of the pastors were concerned that the city might delay on cleanup in the projects, allow mold to grow in flooded buildings, then condemn the buildings so it could move those populations away from a part of town that has been growing wealthier and wealthier. 

At the end of the week New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Sandy rendered many public housing complexes temporarily uninhabitable. They said about 40,000 residents might have to be relocated, especially as winter sets in. 

“This is going to be a massive, massive housing problem,” Cuomo said. “You are going to need a number of options for a number of situations, short-term and long-term.”

“We’re here for the long haul,” said Wasko. “This is going to take a long time for people to recover.”

Want to help?

Trinity Grace Church’s Sandy fund goes directly toward the relief efforts described in the article above. To give, visit the church’s website.

Hope for New York’s Sandy fund distributes support to local ministries in the city. To give, visit the organization’s website.

Donations can also be sent to The Salvation Army and The Bowery Mission to help them in their efforts to help those affected by Superstorm Sandy in lower Manhattan.

Emily Belz
Emily Belz

Emily, who has covered everything from political infighting to pet salons for The Indianapolis Star, The Hill, and the New York Daily News, reports for WORLD from New York City. Follow Emily on Twitter @emlybelz.

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