Virtual Voices

Abortion times a-changin'

Abortion

In 1973, in my feminist folly, I did a victory dance when nine black-robed men somehow found a constitutional "right to privacy" and made abortion the law of the land. In 1975, as a single mother, I aborted my third child, explaining to my 8-year-old daughter Samantha Sunshine, as we walked up Van Ness Street in San Francisco to the Women's Health Collective, how proud we should be of our feminist heritage and freedom.

I never dreamed that the traditionalists were right when they warned us of a "slippery slope," that in the next 38 years "reproductive choice" would claim more than 50 million lives, or that I would live to see abortion become a marriage of Big Business and Secular Sacrament.

Time changes things. For me it's the same dance to a different tune on hearing that a recent Gallup poll finds support for abortion at an all-time low.

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I've been anticipating this moment for a long time. Not until I knew God loved me and had a purpose for my life could I see that an unborn baby's life had meaning, too. In 1987 I was a mother of five when my husband, Tripp, and I became Christians. Since then we've had seven more children through birth and adoption. While I will always grieve the child I murdered, I rejoice each day that God taught me to be pro-life.

This is a battle we will continue to win for several reasons:

  • Medical advances: We now know much more about prenatal development, while ultrasound machines let nearly every mother see her child nestled in the womb. In utero surgeries have enabled many previously hopeless babies to thrive until birth, raising the question, why can the mother decide whose life is worth saving and whose she can throw away?
  • Conservative vs. liberal reproductive tendencies: Pro-lifers tend to have more children-in many cases, a lot more-than pro-abortionists and then pass their values on to future generations. Our numbers are growing all the time.
  • Young people: With a quarter of their cohort missing, many youths have realized their rights were not protected before they were born. For some sensitive souls, the idea that their mothers could have killed them will be a chilling realization and a call to decide for themselves if human life has intrinsic worth. The image of pro-lifers as angry, old, white men is belied by the annual March for Life in Washington, D.C., which radiates youth, joy, and vitality.
  • Guerrilla journalism: At just 24, Lila Rose has become the Joan of Arc of pro-life youth, putting actions to her words by founding Live Action-"a new media movement for life"-and engaging the enemy with video stings. She has entered abortion clinics posing an underage girl pregnant by an older man, a sex trafficker, or a victim of sex trafficking to videotape Planned Parenthood's willingness to cover-up illegal activity that victimizes women. (See La Shawn Barber's "Selective abortion at Planned Parenthood?" Live Action has released another video today on sex-selective abortion involving Planned Parenthood in New York.)
  • Evolving awareness: Just as proponents of slavery characterized blacks as not fully human, today pro-abortionists claim unborn babies-"fetuses"-are not fully human. The argument that humanity is conferred by the will of the mother is an untenable position that will one day be corrected and reviled, just as slavery was.

Although our president believes in no limits to abortion and counts the nation's largest abortion provider among his very best friends, Gallup found that only 20 percent of Americans share President Obama and Planned Parenthood's view.

Liberals need to face the fact that they are now the status quo and the oppressors. But as Bob Dylan once sang to a generation of culture-changers, "The times, they are a-changin'."

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