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Wheat watchers

"Wheat watchers" Continued...

Issue: "Return to war?," May 5, 2012

Houston Mayor Annise Parker wants to protect homeless people from food-borne illnesses, so she is pushing a law that would establish a Recognized Charitable Food Service Provider Program. It would take charge of scheduling times and locations for outside feeding. Unable to convince the city council that sickness from donated food was a problem, she withdrew the ordinance for revisions.

Philadelphia recently banned the outdoor feeding of homeless people in city parks. The council will soon vote on another regulation requiring permits and training in food safety for groups that feed the homeless outdoors. Sharon Kelly, a "Food Not Bombs" volunteer and opponent of the new law, complained to WHYY about "expensive compliance costs for organizations whose efforts are better spent directly combating hunger than dealing with inspectors and bureaucrats." -Susan Olasky

Clean solution

Handout photo

According to UNICEF, 1.5 million children under the age of 5 die each year from diarrhea, and 1.8 million more die from pneumonia. Hand washing with soap before meals and after going to the bathroom could prevent many of those deaths-yet in many rural areas in developing countries, running water is not available. A clever solution for the lack of running water exists. It's called a tippy tap and can be constructed out of cheap local materials-sticks, gravel, a water container, soap, string, a candle, and a nail. Operated by a foot pedal, the tippy tap minimizes the spread of germs. Technology alone won't change behavior, but it can help. A short video showing how easy it is to make a tippy tap is available at tippytap.org. -Susan Olasky

Sophia Lee
Sophia Lee

Sophia is a features reporter for WORLD. She graduated from the University of Southern California with degrees in print journalism and East Asian language and culture. She lives in Los Angeles with her cat, Shalom. Follow Sophia on Twitter @SophiaLeeHyun.

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