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Christian patriot

"Christian patriot" Continued...

Issue: "Border bandits," Dec. 3, 2011

What were some of his specific concerns that relate to our current political debates? Henry was afraid of the president's power. He thought we should assume bad behavior by politicians. Henry was concerned about the absence of provision for jury trials, freedom of speech, and religious liberty. So were others, and people say the anti-Federalists achieved a great victory in getting the Bill of Rights put into the Constitution, which is true. But Henry was not satisfied with the Bill of Rights. He felt we need to have fundamental structural modification of the power of government. Just asserting that the people have certain rights, while at the same time giving the government this kind of power, he thought was foolish.

Listen to Marvin Olasky interview Thomas Kidd about his new book on WORLD's radio news magazine The World and Everything in It.

Book excerpt

By Marvin Olasky

"Henry's general assessment plan would have transitioned Virginia from having a single state church to offering multiple options, ensuring not a strict separation of church and state, but robust religious diversity. ... Henry averred that regardless of who was serving in public office, the United States' most important ally should be virtue. Without that trait, the nation would not last long. Selfishness would ruin the country, and factional squabbling would lead to disunion. ... Government could suppress vice and encourage morality, but it could never change the hearts of people. ... 'The enemy we have to fear,' Henry wrote, 'is the degeneracy, luxury, and vices of the present times. Let us be allied against these and we secure the happiness and liberty of our country.'"

Marvin Olasky
Marvin Olasky

Marvin is editor in chief of WORLD News Group and the author of more than 20 books, including The Tragedy of American Compassion. Follow Marvin on Twitter @MarvinOlasky.

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