Notebook > Lifestyle

Getting grace

"Getting grace" Continued...

Issue: "Beyond the body count," Nov. 5, 2011

For parents who feel they've messed up and done everything wrong, Fitzpatrick offers encouragement: "I was raised in a secular home. Jessica was raised in a legalistic home." And yet both of them are believing Christians today: "God uses failures in fantastic ways. It's not all up to you. ... The beautiful reality is, your work isn't going to save your kids. You can relax. You do not know how God will work. Be weak and throw yourself on the mercy of God."

The essay that started the prairie fire, "Exposing Major Blind Spots of Homeschoolers" by Reb Bradley, is at joshharris.com/2011/09/homeschool_blindspots.php.

Sonic disrupter

By Susan Olasky

Associated Press/Photo by Sue Ogrocki

Fast-food restaurant Sonic is best known for its hotdogs, tater tots, and curbside service. But in Homestead, Fla., Sonic is trying to compete with nearby eateries by adding beer and wine to its menu. Alcohol has high profit margins, and during tough economic times, some restaurants hope beer and wine could boost profits. A New York Times article observed that the idea might work in theory but not in practice. Serving alcohol requires fast-food restaurants to obtain a license and offer special training to staff. In Florida the restaurant had to hire security guards to make sure servers weren't selling alcohol to minors. An executive for the company told the Times that alcohol isn't "a big deal to consumers-it's clear they come to us to have an extra-long cheese coney or an all-beef hot dog." Starbucks and Burger King are also exploring alcohol sales for some of their outlets.

Susan Olasky
Susan Olasky

Susan pens book reviews and other articles for WORLD as a senior writer and has authored eight historical novels for children. Susan and her husband Marvin live in Asheville, N.C. Follow Susan on Twitter @susanolasky.

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