Dispatches > Quick Takes

Quick Takes

"Quick Takes" Continued...

Issue: "Face-off," Aug. 13, 2011

Sleeping easy

In a single day, Justin Werner improved his breathing and sleeping, and even managed to find his way into the Guinness World Records. On Jan. 18, the Topeka, Kan., 21-year-old went in for a tonsillectomy. Werner knew his tonsils were big-just not this big. Once removed, doctors measured his tonsils at 2.1 inches long and 1.1 inches wide-almost twice the size of what Guinness claimed the world's largest tonsils to be. "The day after I got them out, there was no snoring at all," Werner said. "Haven't had a sore throat since." And just recently, Guinness confirmed the measurements and moved his tonsils to the top of its list.

Amusement parks

Good news for acrobatic, fortune-telling jugglers in the Chicago area: Commissioners for the Cook County Forest Preserves on July 13 rescinded a number of old laws that forbade fortune telling, juggling, and acrobatics in the county's vast forest preserves. Commissioners also voted off the books an ordinance that prohibited known thieves, pickpockets, and con men from loitering in the parks. "Someone convicted of a felony, for one, we wouldn't know-and we wouldn't want to engage in any profiling," agency attorney Dennis White told the Chicago Sun-Times.

Trophy timing

The next time Boston Bruins winger Nathan Horton gets a day with the NHL's Stanley Cup, he'll make sure to take the airline's advice and arrive well ahead of departure. Horton, in accordance with the traditional perks of being a member of a Stanley Cup--winning team, tried to take the trophy from Boston to Dunnville, Ontario, for a victory parade. Horton checked the large cup, but when he went to claim his unique luggage, he couldn't find it. After asking JetBlue, he learned that because he checked the Stanley Cup so close to takeoff, the silver trophy had to be delayed to the next flight-forcing Dunnville to delay its parade and robbing Horton of scarce time with the one-of-a-kind sports relic.

Comments

You must be a WORLD member to post comments.

    Keep Reading

     

    Attack bac

    Research points to possible way to target superbugs

    Advertisement