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Beyond basketball

"Beyond basketball" Continued...

The second thing was that the other guys were his lifelong friends. So they were saying, "You're still LeBron to us," not "King James" as he was being called in the papers. They helped keep him grounded. For example, there were times when LeBron would say, "Go interview McGee, he played better than me in this game. Go talk to Dru." There were at least two times that I can recall when LeBron was MVP of a game and he said, "I don't accept it because my teammate Corey Jones played better than me. I played good, but this trophy goes to Corey." Because he showed that kind of humility and didn't put himself higher than the other guys, it made it much easier.
Q. It's interesting you talk about love. I doubt that showing love is something a lot of coaches would describe as part of their job.

My faith is part of everything that I do. I can't compartmentalize it; it's who I am. My wife, the men I study the Word with, they keep me grounded in that faith. I mean, I'm human and there was a time in that first year of coaching that when the spotlight was on me, and I got caught up in the winning and losing and forgot for a moment why God had placed me there. Then after that loss in their junior season, God really spoke to me and made it clear, this is about showing his love to boys and helping them grow into young men.

I believe that God's given me a vehicle. I see coaching as very sacred. I have an opportunity to pour my life into the lives of very young minds. Outside of parenting, what greater responsibility could you have? It's not about basketball. Basketball is just the vehicle that allows me to help build their character.

Megan Basham
Megan Basham

Megan, a regular correspondent for WORLD News Group, is a writer and film critic living in Memphis, Tenn.. She is the author of Beside Every Successful Man: A Woman's Guide to Having It All.

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