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The Chambers-Hiss case

"The Chambers-Hiss case" Continued...

Issue: "NextGen worship," July 26, 2008

Chambers raised such theological issues from the start of his public agony: His first statement to the press, shortly before appearing as a congressional hearing witness, was that he had left the Communist Party because "it was an evil." Chambers throughout the trials argued that it was the near-religious vision of Communism that attracted persons like Hiss. Chambers stated that Americans needed faith in God both for personal salvation and for societal survival in the face of Marxist faith.

Neither the Chicago Tribune nor the Los Angeles Times stressed those theological dimensions. After listening to Chambers, one observer suggested that the question was "no longer whether Alger Hiss is guilty. The question now is whether God exists." Many conservative journalists, like many of their liberal counterparts, seemed uncomfortable with that question.

Marvin Olasky
Marvin Olasky

Marvin is editor in chief of WORLD News Group and the author of more than 20 books, including The Tragedy of American Compassion. Follow Marvin on Twitter @MarvinOlasky.

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