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The world now knows what Gerald Ford really thought: Bill Clinton's a sex addict, Carter was weak, and Bush invaded Iraq for the wrong reasons. The Washington Post speculates on whether Ford's words will influence the 2008 election. He predicted Hillary would run for president but lose.

Barack Obama is having trouble making voters see the differences between him and Hillary Clinton. Analysts say it's because he won't attack her character. Bill Richardson is cultivating a soft, sweet demeanor: "I'm sure not the best looking, or the flashiest, but I know who I am. And I know how hard I'll work for you." Clinton counters him with her own ad: "These days it seems every candidate on earth is coming here for you. But which candidate has been there for you all along?"

Vice President Dick Cheney made another hunting blunder. This time he hunted at a private club that flies the Confederate flag.

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President Bush blasts Congress for "not getting its work done" and wasting "valuable time on a constant stream of investigations, and … endless series of failed votes to pull our troops out of Iraq."

Democrats blast Bush, asking if waterboarding (simulating drowning) is a legitimate interrogation technique or a form of torture. CNN says "Bush has had to retreat to gray-area defenses, using tailored definitions and legalisms to dodge questioners."

The Blackwater controversy continues. Did officials offer Blackwater guards immunity, and will that hinder the investigation of a shootout that left 17 Iraqi civilians dead? Bush has picked an ex-general to head the Department of Veteran Affairs.

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