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Letters from our readers

Issue: "He's in," Sept. 22, 2007

Breaking out

Bravo for "Difference makers" (Aug. 18), about three Christian schools fulfilling the Great Commission by addressing the needs of Christian families who do not fall into the upper 5 percent academically or are not affluent. It is so good to know that there are Christian schools that recognize our needs and are willing to break out of the mold and meet these needs. -Sally Saunders, Tucson, Ariz. fulfilling the Great Commission by addressing the needs of Christian families who do not fall into the upper 5 percent academically or are not affluent. It is so good to know that there are Christian schools that recognize our needs and are willing to break out of the mold and meet these needs.
-Sally Saunders; Tucson, Ariz.

On or off target?

"Tenured bigots" (Aug. 18) was on target. As a tenured professor at a land-grant university, I know what it is like to be marginalized by faculty and students. I have had my speech rights violated. I also know what it is like to encourage undergraduates by identifying myself as an evangelical Christian.
-John P. Chastain; Clemson, S.C.

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Instead of name-calling, why not acknowledge that evangelicals simply have very little interest in the intellectual life? If evangelicals would like to enter academia, let them prove their worth just like everyone else.
-Joel Morehouse; Rochester, N.Y.

Stuck with space

Your article about how Sputnik spurred science education in America ("Orbiting the classroom," Aug. 18) shows how people, with the help of the government, can overestimate their enemies and dive into a long and costly effort to catch up or get even. To this day we are stuck with a multi-billion-dollar space program that no longer accomplishes anything meaningful.
-Andrew Dart; Duncanville, Texas

Dollars and roads

The privatization of our road infrastructure is a step backward ("Fire sale," Aug. 18). We are in this mess only because the federal and state governments cannot control their spending habits and priorities. Transportation taxes already generate more than enough money to cover costs, but the money goes elsewhere. Privatization will just free up more money for the government to waste, while burdening travelers with ever-increasing costs and delays from toll roads and bridges.
-Rick Cortina; Rochester, N.Y.

Joel Belz is right on target with "Fire sale." The ineptness of government-run programs is ludicrous. If buyers are out there, "ready to pay a decent price and take charge" of infrastructure like roads, by all means, let's give them the green light.
-Carolyn L. Smith; Pensacola, Fla.

Belz tosses around the idea of selling our nation's roadways, but sell them to whom? Do we really want our nation's roadways owned by foreign investors or nations? Our roadways are crucial to us economically and for our national security and sovereignty.
-Amanda Larrabee; Manhattan, Kan.

Legally speaking

There is no legal linkage between Eisenhower's decision to send troops to enforce desegregation in Little Rock and Roe v. Wade ("Jackson's deadly mistake," Aug. 18). The Constitution bans racial discrimination by states but does not ban state laws on abortion-if we are judging by original intent. Ike was enforcing the Equal Protection Clause; the Supreme Court was enforcing its own personal preferences when it proclaimed Roe v. Wade would override state abortion laws. However, there is a valid connection between Roe and segregation: Both abortion rights and racial segregation are grounded in the notion that some forms of human life are not entitled to equal protection of the law.
-Michael Farris; Purcellville, Va.

Andrew Jackson was simply wrong, constitutionally and biblically. The distinct status of the Cherokee people as a separate national entity is established in the Constitution and should have been guaranteed by the federal government. The federal government dishonored treaties made in good faith with a highly Christianized people, the Cherokee.
-Mark R. Kreitzer; Fletcher, N.C.

Andrew Jackson's Trail of Tears affected not only Cherokees, but all Five Civilized Tribes, so named because they were farmers, merchants, and city planters. My wife, an enrolled Chickasaw, notes that Jackson's decision led to large numbers of Cherokees, Chickasaws, Choctaws, Creeks, and Seminoles fighting for the Confederacy. Andrew Jackson's image should be struck from the $20 bill or, if he stays, Stonewall Jackson, who established a Sunday school for slaves, should be added.
-Richard L. Centner Jr.; Arlington, Texas

Your balanced treatment of Jackson is appreciated, but every time I get or spend a $20 bill I can't help but think of the Trail of Tears. A man who was willing to start the Civil War nearly 30 years earlier, and not afraid of a fight, might have prevented such a tragedy. I think his failure in that area is reason enough to open up the $20 bill space for Ronald Reagan.
-Jeff Dollar; Ebensburg, Pa.

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