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Generation killer

"Generation killer" Continued...

Issue: "Minority report," Aug. 11, 2007

On issues such as these, Moore says it's time for both tribal and national leaders to get tough. "They come to our reservations and to our powwows, but no one has really sat down and rolled up their sleeves and either really duked it out or worked together to reach a solution on the issues that we both share."

"Meth threatens to eradicate an entire generation," BIA assistant secretary Carl Arman said, underlining the need for immediate action. "This is something we cannot waste a lot of time on."

Moore says spiritual change is urgent, too. He sees a real thirst among young people for something to believe in, but cautions that Indian Country has been "proselytized to death." Many ministries reach out to Indian Country successfully by sowing seeds through service projects and other forms of outreach. But the geographic isolation keeps others who could help from even knowing the reservations exist, and few have the know-how and tenacity to address large problems like meth use.

Moore has not lost hope, though, and claims there are tribal leaders who are willing to step up and make necessary changes. "There's not one single act of Congress to prevent us from setting up a border patrol and charging somebody five bucks every time they come in [to the reservation]," Moore said. "I always say five bucks in, twenty bucks out," he adds with a chuckle.

Moore also believes Native Americans can do more to help their own. "Being Indian is not a terminal disease. In fact, being Lakota for us is actually a benefit because what we have is generational survival mode and strength."

Meth facts

Common names: Crank, crystal, speed

Medical uses: For appetite suppression and to treat anesthetic overdoses, mental depression, and narcolepsy

Methods of usage: Usually injected; also sniffed or taken orally

Small dose effects: Euphoria, increased energy, hyperactivity, sleeplessness

Large dose effects: Hallucinations, paranoia, tremors, high fever, convulsions, heart failure, death

Long-term effects: Physical addiction, distorted perception and thoughts, anxiety, suicidal tendencies

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