Cover Story

Blessed are the meek

"Blessed are the meek" Continued...

Issue: "Miers doesn't fit the mold," Oct. 15, 2005

Evangelical leaders have generally supported Ms. Miers as part of a faith-in-Bush initiative. Jan LaRue, chief counsel for Concerned Women for America, said, "We're giving the president the benefit of the doubt based on his record thus far in nominating judges." Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council, said, "We have a president with a track record of making nominations in keeping with his own philosophy on the judiciary, that of judicial restraint." Focus on the Family founder James Dobson, American Family Association president Tim Wildmon, and Richard Land, head of the Southern Baptist Convention's Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, also gave President Bush the benefit of the doubt.

That faith is likely to be tested first in Judiciary Committee hearings, which should be more interesting than usual since Ms. Miers is not a practiced public performer. It will be tested further if Ms. Miers is confirmed and her initial rulings disappoint evangelicals and conservatives.

This seems unlikely, but the standard for assessing Supreme Court nominations is preponderance of evidence, not proof beyond the shadow of doubt. Some also apply Paul's teaching in chapter one of his first epistle to the Corinthians: "Where is the one who is wise? . . . Has not God made foolish the wisdom of the world? . . . God chose what is foolish in the world to shame the wise."

If President Bush and supporters of the Miers nomination are wrong, the Supreme Court won't change but the Republican Party will, as millions of conservatives see GOP rule as shameful and look elsewhere for leadership.

Marvin Olasky
Marvin Olasky

Marvin is editor in chief of WORLD News Group and the author of more than 20 books, including The Tragedy of American Compassion. Follow Marvin on Twitter @MarvinOlasky.

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