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Saving Abigails

"Saving Abigails" Continued...

Issue: "Curt Schilling: Never hide," March 19, 2005

But shades of meaning are nowhere as important as in the Middle East, and by March 9 the two sides edged apart, disputing exactly what is meant by "Jericho." Palestinian leaders want Israel's military roadblocks removed not only from towns but from "their surrounding areas," Mr. Abbas said, while Mr. Mofaz harked back to proceeding "step by step" as the Sharon-Abbas arrangement suggests. What is new about the old pull-and-tug is the zeal on both sides to show the world each is living up to its word. In Tel Aviv and Gaza political leaders scrambled to resolve the security dispute, displaying a momentum evident from Beirut to Baghdad to Cairo. Its underlying cause-a tenacious U.S. policy and presence in the region-is now being served up not only by the right but also the left.

Newspapers and commentators who opposed the Iraq war are echoing the question asked by the liberal British newspaper The Independent in a headline last week: "Was Bush right after all?" Others who are also considering that possibility:

· Canadian columnist Richard Gwyn of the Toronto Star: "Here it is time to set down in type the most difficult sentence in the English language. That sentence is short and simple. It is this: Bush was right."

· Rüdiger Lentz, Washington correspondent for the German broadcast network Deutsche Welle: "One has to acknowledge that Afghanistan and Iraq might have been catalysts for what we see now happening in Lebanon, in Egypt and even between the Palestinians and Israel."

· The Guardian of London: "We need to face up to the fact that the Iraq invasion has intensified pressure for democracy in the Middle East."

· NPR senior news analyst Daniel Schorr: "During the run-up to the invasion of Iraq, President Bush said that 'a liberated Iraq can show the power of freedom to transform that vital region.' He may have had it right."

· French essayist Guy Sorman in Le Figaro: "Either Bush is lucky, or it is too early to judge or [Bush's] analysis was not false."

· Comedy Central's Jon Stewart: "I don't care for the tactics, I don't care for the weird arrogance. . . . But I gotta say, I haven't seen results like this ever in that region."

Jamie Dean
Jamie Dean

Jamie lives and works in North Carolina, where she covers the national political beat and other topics as news editor for WORLD. Follow Jamie on Twitter @deanworldmag.

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