Voices > Mailbag

Mailbag

"Mailbag" Continued...

Issue: "Daniel of the Year 2004," Dec. 11, 2004

The only FCB business decision that appalled me more than opening on Sunday was when the store offered a "free" Bible to anyone who applied for its credit card.
-Toni Rhoads; Oscoda, Mich.

Where are our hearts with regard to the Sabbath? Are they conformed to the materialistic, entertainment- and convenience-oriented society in which we live? Or, are we willing to accept this gift from our Intelligent Designer who is willing to bless us richly in the observance of His day?
-Glen Knecht Jr.; Cambridge, N.Y.

I have spent hundreds of dollars at FCB, but no more. FCB's true lodestar becomes apparent in its appeal to constituency polls. Such data, unfortunately, only underscores the truism that American evangelicalism is a mile wide and an inch deep. How sad.
-Joe Martin; Virginia Beach, Va.

Hijacked

The resolution by PCUSA to condemn Israel for protecting herself from suicide terrorists is just the tip of the left-wing iceberg ("Taking stock," Nov. 13). As an elder, I believe that the leadership of this beautiful, mainline Protestant denomination has been hijacked by social justice ideologues.
-J. Michael Urton; Coolidge, Ariz.

Own your own

You mention President Bush plans to make "major changes in Social Security to allow workers to own their own retirement accounts" (The Buzz, Nov. 13). How about letting workers own their own retirement accounts? Why do so many people, including conservative Republicans, still want Uncle Sam to oversee every area of their lives?
-Jim Johnson; Clarks Summit, Pa.

Corrections

  • Israeli Baruch Maoz pastors a Reformed Baptist congregation (The Buzz, Oct. 30, p. 10).
  • Black women make up about 6.5 percent of the U.S. population ("Diversity of life," Nov. 6, p. 33).
  • The Marines pictured arresting Iraqi men in Fallujah are from the 1st Division (The Buzz, Nov. 20, p. 8).

Comments

You must be a WORLD member to post comments.

    Keep Reading

     

    Phoning it in

    Tests via smartphone may soon challenge traditional methods

    Advertisement