Dispatches > Quotables

Quotables

Issue: "Considering the heavens," Jan. 24, 2004

I always wanted to be the first woman to carry out a martyr attack.

Palestinian suicide bomber Reem Raiyshi, a 22-year-old mother of two, in a Hamas video she recorded before an attack last week in which she killed herself and four Israelis in Gaza.

We must take unilateral action.

Then-Vermont Gov. Howard Dean in a 1995 letter to President Bill Clinton, urging that the United States should intervene in the war in Bosnia regardless of the opinion of the international community. As he campaigns for president, Dr. Dean has sharply criticized President Bush for invading Iraq without international approval.

I think I'll have hardening of the arteries before I have mad cow disease.

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Cecelia Coan of Evansville, Ind., on ordering deep-fried cow brain sandwiches at Evansville's Hilltop Inn. Area German-heritage restaurants, which sell the local delicacy, report that the popularity of the sandwiches has not fallen despite the emergence of a cow with the brain-wasting disease in Washington state.

I respect books too much to throw one together.

Former Democratic presidential candidate Carol Moseley-Braun on why, alone among this year's presidential candidates, she didn't write a book to go along with her campaign. Most such books, says former presidential aide Stephen Hess, are "cut-and-paste jobs of speeches and position papers."

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