Features

Around the horn

National

Issue: "How to fix baseball," June 21, 2003

There will be no Battle of the Sexes, Round Two. At least not for Annika Sorenstam, who made history by playing in the PGA's Colonial in May. She got a chuckle when PGA journeyman John Riegger challenged her to an 18-hole match for $1 million. But she wasn't interested. "I did what I wanted to do, and I had a great time doing it. It was the biggest challenge of my life, and that's where I want to leave it." ... The basketball coaching carousel moved from the college ranks to the NBA in early June and late May. With Rudy Tomjanovich's departure from Houston, former Knicks coach Jeff Van Gundy seemed poised to hang up his microphone and return to the court. The Hornets fired Paul Silas and hired Tim Floyd, while Mr. Silas moved on to help Cleveland enter the age of LeBron James. Still looking: Washington, Philadelphia, and Toronto.... Funny Cide's defeat at Belmont was the latest failed bid for horse racing's famed Triple Crown-victories in the Kentucky Derby, Preakness, and Belmont Stakes. The sport has now endured 26 years of near misses since Affirmed won all three in 1978.... Triple Crowns in baseball are even more unique. It's been 36 years since Red Sox slugger Carl Yastrzemski won baseball's Triple Crown in 1967, leading the league in home runs (44), RBIs (121) and batting average (.326). St. Louis outfielder Joe Medwick was the National League's last winner in 1937. Toronto's Carlos Delgado, St. Louis's Albert Pujols, and Atlanta's Gary Sheffield all may make runs at the feat this season.

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