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National

Issue: "Memorial Day 2003," May 24, 2003

In terms of sports business, the $102 million contract Minnesota Vikings owner Red McCombs awarded to all-everything quarterback Daunte Culpepper may amount to a new coat of paint or a new roof. That's because new offers to buy Mr. McCombs's Vikings have started to mount, and the San Antonio car baron is in a selling mood. But he'd like to get around $600 million for the team and a bright future at quarterback could increase the club's value.... For the dozens that follow Florida Marlins baseball, the firing of former skipper Jeff Torborg was no shock. But hiring 72-year-old Jack McKeon may have been the last thing Marlins fans expected. Said Miami Herald columnist Greg Cote: "The team's new marketing slogan? 'These are not your grandfather's Marlins. However, they are managed by your grandfather.'" ... Major League Baseball votes Democratic-at least with its checkbook. Federal Elections Commission disclosures revealed that MLB's political action committee contributed $108,000 to 65 congressional candidates last year. By a 60-40 split, baseball favored Democrats over Republicans.... Golfer Vijay Singh has some vitriol for Annika Sorenstam, who has accepted an invitation to play the Colonial golf tournament. "I hope she misses the cut," Mr. Singh said after his runner-up finish in the Wachovia Championship. "Why? Because she doesn't belong out here." Ms. Sorenstam, widely acclaimed as the best female golfer in the world, accepted a sponsors exemption and will become the first female to compete in a PGA event in nearly 60 years.

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