Dispatches > Quotables

Quotables

Issue: "The Road to Damascus," Sept. 21, 2002

"The school district doesn't own those kids."

Charles Miller, University of Texas regents chairman, after Austin public-school officials objected to a UT plan to open a charter school. Pat Forgione, superintendent of schools in Austin, had complained that the new school would reduce attendance at the public schools.

"People don't trust our ability to run an election."

Miami-Dade County Mayor Alex Penelas, after problems with new voting equipment and other irregularities at polling places plagued last week's primary races in Florida.

"What good is religion if you can't apply it?"

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Akron, Ohio, landlord ", whose right to refuse-on moral grounds-to rent a house to an unmarried couple was upheld by the Ohio Civil Rights Commission.

"The purest definition of leadership was watching Johnny Unitas get off the team bus."

New York Giants general manager and former Baltimore Colts publicist Ernie Accorsi, on the legendary Colts quarterback's understated but powerful manner. Mr. Unitas, who died on Sept. 11 of a heart attack, held 22 NFL passing records at the time of his retirement in 1973.

"A golden age of sorts."

Bankruptcy lawyer Jack Partain, on his booming business as the number of large companies filing for bankruptcy protection proceeds at a record pace. Forty-nine large, publicly traded companies filed during the first six months of 2002; a record 95 filed for bankruptcy protection last year.

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