Cover Story

Holiday of horror

Issue: "Guns & Poses," April 13, 2002

3/27: Suicide bomber Abdel-Basset Odeh paced outside the lobby of a hotel in Netanya where over 250 Jews were gathering for a Seder marking the beginning of Passover. When he detonated the explosives strapped inside his shirt, the attack killed 26 and wounded 125. Hamas claimed responsibility.

3/28: Ahmed Hafez Saadat, a Hamas militant, opened fire inside a Jewish settlement near Nablus, killing four Jewish settlers.

3/29: 18-year-old Ayat al-Akhras walked into a supermarket in Jerusalem with a belt of explosives strapped at her waist, killing two Israelis and wounding 28 others. In a tape left behind, she said she was a member of the Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades, an arm of Palestinian Authority Chairman Yasser Arafat's Fatah group.

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3/30: Suicide bomber Mohannad Salahat, from the Fatah military wing of Mr. Arafat's Palestinian Authority, blew himself up in a crowded Tel Aviv café, injuring more than 30 people.

3/31: Shadi Tubasi entered an Arab-owned restaurant at lunchtime in Haifa and blew himself up, killing 14 and injuring more than 40. Hamas [Iran] and Islamic Jihad each claimed responsibility.

3/31: A suicide bomber in Efrat blew himself up outside a medical center, wounding six.

4/1: Attack averted in downtown Jerusalem; a 19-year-old policeman died when he stopped the bomber at a roadblock. The Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades [Iran] took responsibility for the attack.

Mindy Belz
Mindy Belz

Mindy travels to the far corners of the globe as the editor of WORLD and lives with her family in the mountains of western North Carolina. Follow Mindy on Twitter @mcbelz.

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