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Understanding MOUs

"Understanding MOUs" Continued...

Issue: "Mad Dash," Dec. 16, 2000

Mr. Guiton acknowledged that he has filed claims against the rebels but would not discuss them, saying, "It is confidential. I don't want to jeopardize negotiations." Those negotiations may be difficult: Steven Wondu, the SPLA's spokesman in Washington, D.C., insisted that "World Vision decided to pull out. [The food] was meant for needy people there, and it was not World Vision's food. The people who it was meant for got it. I don't see where the dispute is."

If the flap over the missing food reinforced World Vision's concerns, it also fueled Sudanese suspicions that World Vision was no longer interested in local needs. Residents and relief workers in areas once covered by World Vision said nearly all of those programs collapsed upon the organization's swift departure. Primary health care facilities had no medicine. Water maintenance teams were suddenly without tools, spare parts, or transportation.

Mindy Belz
Mindy Belz

Mindy travels to the far corners of the globe as the editor of WORLD and lives with her family in the mountains of western North Carolina. Follow Mindy on Twitter @mcbelz.

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