Voices > Mailbag

Mailbag

Issue: "Who'll be king of the Hill?," Oct. 7, 2000

Decoding DeCSS

Regarding your article about DVD "piracy," DeCSS is not primarily used for making pirate copies of DVDs ("Net pirates walk the plank," Sept. 9). Given enough computer resources, illegal copies of DVDs can already be made "bit-by-bit" without decoding. DeCSS allows owners of DVDs to play their own DVD disks on computers using the Linux operating system with free software, rather than on Windows or a commercial player that provides royalty income to the DVD Control Association members. - David Ormand, Tucson, Ariz.

Reality check

The Sept. 2 "In the Spotlight" featured the Maxis computer game The Sims. Just the day before reading that article, a friend I was visiting asked his 11-year-old granddaughter to show me some of her favorite games, thinking they might be of interest to my children. The girl brought up her Sims community on her computer and showed me how the scantily clad man and woman could hug and kiss. She showed me how the man could turn on the "vibrating" bed at which time he removed the remainder of his clothes. He then walked to the toilet (which he used) and by the time he got to the shower, her grandfather had recovered from his shock and had her shut down the game. While her grandfather will deal with his granddaughter, I suggest that parents be vigilant with regards to how their children spend their time. - Linda Murray, Sunland, Calif.

The time is coming

We see you’ve been enjoying the content on our exclusive member website. Ready to get unlimited access to all of WORLD’s member content?
Get your risk-free, 30-Day FREE Trial Membership right now.
(Don’t worry. It only takes a sec—and you don’t have to give us payment information right now.)

Get your risk-free, 30-Day FREE Trial Membership right now.

Chris Stamper's critique of Social Security fuels my long-held belief that the scheme is not only ill-conceived but dangerous ("Old, bad deal," Sept. 9). Social Security is now paying me less than $10,000 per year, but the fund is going broke and I might live another 20 years. From the government's point of view, it would be better if I were dead. A policy of gericide could save billions of dollars annually. Hysteria? I don't think so. Americans used to be horrified at the thought of widespread abortion, but at the urging of liberal politicians and activists, abortion has become to many people not only acceptable but virtuous. History is being repeated with euthanasia. In countries like The Netherlands, where abortion first became respectable, seniors are terminated with or without their cooperation. In the United States, Jack Kervorkian has many American supporters for his program of eternal rest. Politicians cannot yet risk advocating such a policy, but the time is coming. - Robert Ausband, Gainesville, Fla.

Alternatives available

"Stemming an ethical tide" and "Brits go a step further" do not mention that stem cells taken from adults are already being used as an alternative to those harvested from embryos. It is important to use the alternative to avert a run on unborn donors. - Jules Schindler, Novato, Calif.

Helpful

I appreciated the views expressed about education and the presidential candidates ("Presidential pedagogy," Sept. 9). This is very relevant and helpful for sorting out campaign issues. - Michael Reardon, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.

Sooner or later

I am glad to hear of the start of Patrick Henry College, but I am worried because too often Christian colleges become so concerned about gaining and keeping accreditation that they jettison their Christian worldview ("Give me Patrick Henry," Sept. 9). This happens, in part, because to maintain accreditation institutions hire professors with degrees from state-run universities, and sooner or later the humanistic philosophy they learned in graduate school reappears. If an institution produces quality graduates, there should be no need for accreditation. - Craig L. Shoemaker, Grand Rapids, Mich.

Sooner or later

I am glad to hear of the start of Patrick Henry College, but I am worried because too often Christian colleges become so concerned about gaining and keeping accreditation that they jettison their Christian worldview ("Give me Patrick Henry," Sept. 9). This happens, in part, because to maintain accreditation institutions hire professors with degrees from state-run universities, and sooner or later the humanistic philosophy they learned in graduate school reappears. If an institution produces quality graduates, there should be no need for accreditation. - Craig L. Shoemaker, Grand Rapids, Mich.

Praise for praise songs

I usually feel Mr. Veith is right on target, but I take issue with his statement about the camp song "Kum Ba Ya," that "like other praise songs-it does not carry any specific doctrinal meaning" ("Censoring 'Kum Ba Ya,'" Sept. 2). I heartily concur that the majority of good hymns are full of good doctrine, but the majority of praise songs I know are taken directly from Scripture, from which we all draw doctrine, or have many Scriptural references. - Debbie King, Manassas, Va.

Comments

You must be a WORLD member to post comments.

    Keep Reading

     

    Scorpion

    Team up a computer prodigy, a mechanical whiz, a…

    Advertisement