Culture

The Music

Culture | Top 5 Heatseekers albums for the week ending Sept. 9, 2000, according to Billboard

Issue: "Breaking the term limit," Sept. 16, 2000
According to Billboard magazine, "The Heatseekers chart lists the best-selling titles by new and developing artists, defined as those who have never appeared in the top 100 of the Billboard 200 chart."
1
No One Does It Better
Soul Decision
STYLE
The latest twist on "boy-band" pop, this time with occasional echoes of Motown resounding within the fashionably glossy production.

BEST CUTS
"Next Time," "I Don't Need Anyone"

WORLDVIEW
Puppy love and its discontents make the world go 'round.

We see you’ve been enjoying the content on our exclusive member website. Ready to get unlimited access to all of WORLD’s member content?
Get your risk-free, 30-Day FREE Trial Membership right now.
(Don’t worry. It only takes a sec—and you don’t have to give us payment information right now.)

Get your risk-free, 30-Day FREE Trial Membership right now.

ROLE MODEL STATUS
With neither suggestive lyrics nor visible tattoos and only one earring among them, David Bowman, Trevor Guthrie, and Ken Lewko come off refreshingly unbesmirched in terms of both their form and their content.

2
Live in London and More
Donnie McClurkin
STYLE
Worship music for soulful male voice and chorale, with fade outs and sparkling sound suggestive of post-performance touch-ups.

BEST CUTS
"Who Would've Thought," "Caribbean Medley"

WORLDVIEW
Evangelically Christian.

ROLE MODEL STATUS
"Donnie's ministry of his deliverance from sin and the miracle of his healing from leukemia has [sic] reached millions of countries [sic]," reads Mr. McClurkin's PR. "He is an inspiration to many and regularly appears before audiences led by Benny Hinn, Rod Parsley, [and] Bishop T.D. Jakes and at Azusa and Promise Keepers conventions."

3
Figgas 4 Life
Major Figgas
STYLE
Rap.

BEST CUTS
None.

WORLDVIEW
It's a jungle out there in which only the fittest-i.e., those capable of turning the drugs, sex, and violence at the heart of "thug life" to their own financial and social advantage-survive.

ROLE MODEL STATUS
Three liner thanks go to "Allah" and two to "God," but the "gangsta" obscenities and crudities in the "songs" obscure whatever piety may lurk in the hearts of the Figgas themselves.

4
Playmate of the Year
Zebrahead
STYLE
Cheerfully hard-driving guitar rock-well played, well shouted, and well produced.

BEST CUTS
"Wasted," "Subtract You," "The Hell That Is My Life"

WORLDVIEW
The obsession isn't so much with sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll as with the way such "solutions" end up causing even more pain from which to seek refuge.

ROLE MODEL STATUS
The Democratic Party may have foresworn Playboy, but Zebrahead hasn't, not with an actual bikini-clad "playmate" on the cover and a link to Playboy merchandise at the Zebrahead website.

5
Unchained Spirit
Buju Banton
STYLE
Afro-soul rooted in Jamaican dancehall, ragga, and reggae music.

BEST CUTS
"23rd Psalm," "Voice of Jah"

WORLDVIEW
Devoutly Rastafarian, with a special aversion to war ("Guns and Bombs") and famine ("Sudan") and a special affection for Scripture, interpreted his way.

ROLE MODEL STATUS
Having spent the last seven years outgrowing his youthful reputation for sexually and socially abrasive lyrics and stances, Mr. Banton has become a respected practitioner of Rastafarianism and an advocate of politically correct solutions (i.e., condom usage) to global crises (i.e., AIDS).

IN THE SPOTLIGHT
Marshall Crenshaw has made a career of being a "heatseeker": After 20 years of wowing critics, the 46-year-old Detroit native remains better known to the public for portraying John Lennon (Beatlemania) and Buddy Holly (La Bamba) than for any of the 10 albums he's recorded under his own name. The Best of Marshall Crenshaw: This Is Easy (Rhino/Warner Archives), a 22-track overview of Mr. Crenshaw's greatest misses, suggests that his commercial failure has more to do with the inability of a trend-obsessed music industry to market timeless music than with the music itself. His formula is simple. He sets perennial rock 'n' roll subjects such as the elusiveness of love and the inevitability of heartbreak to bright guitars, rockabilly-based backbeats, and irresistible sing-along choruses while resisting raunch, delusions of political grandeur, and other artistically debilitating flights of fancy. He focuses instead on rock 'n' roll's capacity to locate the eternal in even the most ephemeral of yearnings. In his way, Mr. Crenshaw may yet do as much for the music that John Lennon and Buddy Holly taught him to love as John Lennon and Buddy Holly themselves lived to do.

Comments

You must be a WORLD member to post comments.

    Keep Reading

     

    In with the old

    Queen compilation albums work better than the best and…

    Advertisement