Dispatches > Quotables

Quotables

Issue: "Alan Keyes: Can he win?," March 13, 1999

My brother is another Judas Iscariot, except that, unlike the original Judas, he doesn't even have the courage to hang himself.

Unabomber Ted Kaczynski, writing in his new book about his brother David, who turned him in to federal authorities.

Yes, they are going to have real problems and no one is going to notice, because ... nothing works over there right now.

U.S. Senator Robert Bennett, summarizing the findings of a Senate team sent to Russia to assess the impact of Y2K disruptions in that country.

He likes to interact with young people. He thinks he can pass along something to them.

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Sandi Gibbons, spokeswoman for the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office, on infamous mass murderer Charles Manson's participation by telephone in a mock trial for students at Newman University.

The men who committed this crime meant it for evil against a black man, but God meant it for good.

The Rev. Kenneth Lyons, of Greater New Bethel Baptist Church in Jasper, Texas, on the forceful verdict against John William King, who murdered James Byrd Jr. by dragging him behind a pick-up truck. Byrd's parents belong to the church.

Long ago, the buffalo gave his blood for us. Today, we give our blood for him.

Joseph Chasing Horse, Lakota Sioux leader, during a pilgrimage from Rapid City, S.D., to Yellowstone National Park. About 100 Indians went on the trek, asking for an end to the killing of bison that wander out of the park.

John Doe No. 1.

CNBC's Chris Matthews, referring to Bill Clinton, the man behind all the Jane Does of the recent impeachment trial.

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