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Mailbag

"Mailbag" Continued...

Issue: "Postmodern politics," Sept. 12, 1998

IreLand

Regarding the ongoing tragedy in Ireland, a poem I wrote back in the '70s, "IreLand, the Old Country," goes like this: The catholics and protestants are having a ball/ shooting each other and that isn't all/ They take the young girls, (with the least of disgrace)/ they tar and feather and mess up their face/ They toss little bombs into restaurants and bars/ blowing up people in movies and cars/ They come to the door without even a knock/ and with their nice rifles they blow off the lock/ The husband is taken where the wife cannot see/ They blow out his brains and then he's set free/ from the things people do whenever they're bored. And these things they do in the name of the Lord." - Wesley C. Linton, Indianapolis, Ind.

Eating our words

You did not disappoint me. In "Statist salads" (Aug. 1), the word gourmand was used-you meant gourmet. But I love WORLD and would miss the all-too-human weekly peccadillos. - Raymond P. Vigneault, Houston, Texas

Full of bias and innuendoes

We have just receive notification of time for renewal of our subscription to WORLD magazine but have decided to decline renewal. Your reporting is not only extremely biased but is filled with innuendoes-particularly regarding the Clintons. - Robert A.Langel, Blacksburg, Va.

Reports from abroad

I enjoy Chris Stamper's The Buzz. For those of us in the hinterlands, it is interesting to see what is happening at the boundaries of our civilization. - Scott Linn, Melbourne, Fla.

Drop those Commandments!

Earlier this year the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate passed resolutions calling for the display of the Ten Commandments in public buildings. At that time, representatives of the National Clergy Council and the Ten Commandments Project delivered an artistic rendition of the Commandments as a gift to the White House. The liaison for religious affairs rudely rejected the Ten Commandments and demanded that they be sent back where they came from (we were never sure if she meant the Capitol or Mt. Sinai). Several months later, when a copy was to be presented to the United States Congress, Mr. Clinton was again offered a copy of the Ten Commandments. This time we were informed that the president was too busy. We offered to meet with his representative, an option we thought would be easily afforded us since the religious liaison had just recently met with the American Atheists. Nonetheless, a meeting was not to be. However, the White House did change its position. Rather than rudely rejecting the Ten Commandments, the White House decided rudely to accept them instead. We were to meet a White House official and deliver the Commandments. This meeting was then changed to the Old Executive Office Building next door to the White House. On the day of the presentation we were told to "just drop them off in the mailroom at the annex building." There would be no presentation, no representative, nothing. Just drop them at the door and leave. When the clergy delegation arrived at the mailroom, they were rudely evicted from the building by an officer. Four members of the clergy were allowed to drop the Commandments off at the mailroom and then shown the door. What a contrast to our reception at the Capitol Building later that day. Rep. Dick Armey interrupted a meeting to welcome us in his private office. He graciously accepted the Commandments. - Rev. Martin Eppard, National Clergy Council

What's not created

In the article "Jesus was a vegetarian?" (Aug. 15), someone affiliated with PETA was trying to get Christians on the animal rights bandwagon. He was quoted as saying, "Christians should extend the message that 'God is love' by not eating his creation." What exactly are we supposed to eat? Where does he get uncreated, meat-free food? Even the dust serpents eat is created by God. - Nick Pfost, Lexington, S.C.

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