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Mailbag

Issue: "Missionary hostages," Feb. 20, 1998

Renaissance man

It was amazing and encouraging to read how Mr. and Mrs. Palau interacted with the elite of the Renaissance group ("Renaissance man," Jan. 24). As experienced as they are with the public spotlight, they still found this group completely different. In my opinion, every believer should take advantage of the opportunity gently and kindly, but clearly and concisely, to point out the biblical perspective in a situation. Mr. Palau's faithfulness came through in this vivid description of "seed-planting" at its finest. The story was a wonderful perspective on the Renaissance event. As usual, you pick a "media-covered" event and give us inside details the secular media missed completely. - Kathy Ritenour, Tampa, Fla.

We are all strangers

I appreciated your article, "Immigrants: A threat or gospel opportunity?"(Jan. 24). I should point out that except for the native American Indians, all Americans are immigrants. The only difference is that the shift is now focused on Asians and Hispanics-the new wave of immigrants. If it weren't for our forefathers, today's Caucasians and African Americans wouldn't be able to stand on the streets of America protesting immigration and sneering at minority groups who don't look like, dress like, or talk like we do. Immigrants shouldn't be viewed as a threat, but embraced with the love of Jesus Christ! - Patrick Koh, newlifesbc@juno.com

Hard work, not handout

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Immigrants tend to be family and work oriented. However, it does seem unjust that many immigrants are able to come and live off the dole without ever paying the taxes that pay for the aid. The problem is not immigration, but huge government programs disbursing public money on questionable welfare programs. With substantial welfare reform-allowing people the opportunity to get on their feet without giving them a free ride-immigration should become much less of an issue. - John Wood, jdwood@wwa.com

Four-letter family fun?

Culture Notes (Jan. 24) listed the biggest money-making movies of 1997. While I am happy that more family-oriented movies are being made, I totally disagree with the vice chairman of TriStar when she states that Men in Black appeals to everybody from small children to grandparents. So what if it wasn't rated R, it still had several four-letter words, not to mention the use of God's name in vain. Is this the kind of language those in Hollywood would like us to believe their "small children" use? Mine certainly don't, and that's why we cannot assume that just because a movie is not rated R, it is suitable for children or even adults to view. - Sandie Cervantes, Riverside, Calif.

No cause for rejoicing

It is naive to rejoice that PG and PG-13 films outperformed R films when confronted with the reality that today's PG-13 is, in fact, the R movie of yesteryear. PG-13 films routinely feature the f-word, graphic violence, and sexual situations. PG films just as routinely feature "mild" profanity and sexual innuendo. Instead of lauding the studios for successfully marketing profanity, sexual immorality, and gore as "family fare," WORLD should be lamenting a society that continues to lower the barrier between what is suitable for children and what is suitable for adults. - Tamara Swindler, Scottsdale, Ariz.

WORLD's restraint

Thank you for not pasting Monica Lewinsky's picture on the front cover of your magazine. It seems that every liberal magazine did so. Your choice shows reasonable constraint which I believe should mark Christian journalism. - Ronald H. Elwardt, Phoenix, Ariz.

I sense a bigger picture

I hope evangelicals seriously think through the worldview that endorses birth control. As one who was put on birth control pills five years prior to any sexual activity (I was 12 and the doctor said that they would reduce cramps), and whose later sexual irresponsibility landed me in the abortion mills several times, and then on welfare, I sense a bigger picture. When abortion and contraceptives conceive, they birth reproductive rights, "and when sin is finished it brings forth death." - Star Parker, Los Angeles, Calif.

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