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Mailbag

Issue: "Peretti on publishing," Oct. 25, 1997

Critical error

Our dear brother and highly respected friend E. V. Hill, by following his heart, made an error of judgment in stating that no church laws were broken ("Razing the standard," Sept. 20). God, however, calls us to the higher standard of biblical ethics. Misuse of funds because the source is a large and presumably white corporation cannot be excused. All the lists of qualifications for church leaders (1 Timothy 3:3, 8; Titus 1:7; 1 Peter 5:2) include strong statements forbidding greed. Supporting a leader allegedly caught in sin, with no subsequent indication of confession, makes a mockery of Christianity and cruelly robs our African-American brothers in Christ of the respect they so desperately want and deserve. - David L. Keener, Fayetteville, Pa.

Disgusting display

I was appalled, shocked, stunned, and angry after reading "Razing the standard." I am very disappointed in E. V. Hill's actions and statements. I find the whole situation disgusting (the Lyons events before the convention, the mobilization effort by Mr. Lyons prior to the convention, and the events at the convention). - M. Rotty, Tucson, Ariz.

No excuses

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I have brothers in the National Baptist Convention and it grieves me that this organization has lost its mooring. To excuse un-Christian living by someone in leadership is always wrong-no excuses! I was particularly shocked by the quotes from E.V. Hill, a man revered by so many brothers and sisters. Don't back off from telling the truth. The truth will never hurt the cause of Christ. - Roger D. Willis, Simi Valley, Calif.

Why review rot?

I am 14 years old, and I look forward to your magazine coming every week. There seems to be a contradiction between what you say and what you do in one particular area. You write about avoiding the bad influences of many television programs. Yet in almost every issue you have reviews of R-rated movies that are full of vulgar language, violence, and sexual themes. What is the purpose of these reviews? They do not encourage me in my walk with the Lord. - Rachel Moran, Williamsville, N.Y.

Machen speaks

Your coverage of church news is insightful. As an evangelical pastor in the Presbyterian Church (USA), I am interested in and concerned about the state of the PCUSA. I follow the issues facing my denomination closely. To my knowledge, no one else has demonstrated and applied the perspectives held by Warfield and Machen to our current impasse ("PCUSA: Chastity or 'integrity,'" Sept. 20). Warfield's words concerning the difficulty in splitting "rotten wood" feels like cold water striking a sleepy face. - Gary W. Miller, Canton, Ohio

The doc needs doctrine

I enjoyed your article on Dr. Laura Schlessinger. Though I do not agree with her on every issue, I find her willingness to uphold the standard of marital fidelity and personal integrity refreshing in a time when many Christian leaders shrink from their responsibilities to speak truth. It grieves me to hear Christians call her with questions that should be brought instead before the body. One Christian woman asked if she should marry a man who attended a church that denied the literal resurrection. Dr. Laura concluded that, as long as their churches maintained the same basic moral framework, insignificant details such as the resurrection could be overlooked. - Sandra L. Hinckle, Westerly, R.I.

Can we be sure?

I am a 14-year-old homeschooler writing concerning your articles on Mother Teresa. In "Symbol of selflessness" (Sept. 20) you state that her theology was questionable. A quote from her in your magazine stated, "I convert you to be a better Hindu or a better Muslim or a better Protestant." The Bible clearly tells us the only way for a person to be saved is to believe in Jesus (John 6:47; 14:6). In "An ordinary faith" (Oct. 4) it states that last month "the gates of heaven finally welcomed Mother Teresa home." There is no denying that Mother Teresa did some wonderful works, but we cannot be saved by works (Ephesians 2:8-9). Therefore can we really be sure of her salvation? - Melissa Hamel, Princeton, Mass.

Can we be sure?

I am a 14-year-old homeschooler writing concerning your articles on Mother Teresa. In "Symbol of selflessness" (Sept. 20) you state that her theology was questionable. A quote from her in your magazine stated, "I convert you to be a better Hindu or a better Muslim or a better Protestant." The Bible clearly tells us the only way for a person to be saved is to believe in Jesus (John 6:47; 14:6). In "An ordinary faith" (Oct. 4) it states that last month "the gates of heaven finally welcomed Mother Teresa home." There is no denying that Mother Teresa did some wonderful works, but we cannot be saved by works (Ephesians 2:8-9). Therefore can we really be sure of her salvation?

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